01 August 2006

Train Wreck


A number of labor intensive scratchboard projects crossed the desk in early August. The above full page piece was for the American Bar Association, dealing with law education. The piece below was for Log Home Living, and concerned 'smart houses'.

Continuing with my new reputation for being the 'go to' guy for historical and/or water related illustration, this series of drawings for Cricket magazine came my way in late July early August.

The story this time concerned a cub scout troop and their experiences during an infamous train wreck in New Zealand's history. A volcano had erupted nearby, sending massive amounts of melted snow crashing down the valley, taking out a bridge and resulting in much destruction and loss of life. Told from the viewpoint of one of the scouts, this gave me the opportunity to do one of those 'Boy's Life'-type adventure stories that I read as a child while waiting in the doctor's office.

Crowd scenes and chaos and destruction are never easy to draw, not necessarily from an emotional standpoint, but more from a logistical one. There wasn't much in the way of research materials for this event, a few grainy old newspaper photos of the wrecked train, and I had to do my best to portray the scout's uniforms, the train interior and period costumes flying on the seat of my pants, and hiding my complete lack of knowledge in some clever positioning of rocks, debris and portions of surrounding characters.

Most of the drawings were to bleed off the edge of the pages, and fade off into the text, so I frequently end up with odd shaped illustrations from this client. (especially the opening scene, pictured at the bottom of the entry, shaped like a big inverted letter L).

Some of the most enjoyable portions of this assignment were the action scenes, especially the one set in the interior of the coach as one of the boys rescues one of his mates as the cabin fills with muddy and frigid water. I don't remember if I enlisted the help of my son for posing for these boys or not, but it is entirely likely that I did.


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