18 November 2003

Misc November Work


The above illustration was for the Chronicle of Higher Education, and was a long horizontal that stretched across the top of a newspaper tabloid sized page.
Below was an illustration for what was once a regular customer of mine back in the 90s, Legal Times, a newspaper out of Washington DC. I used to do pieces almost on a weekly basis for this client, but then a change of personnel diminished that workload to an assignment once over couple of months, and it gradually dwindled down to nothing by the following spring.




Above are four 'health care' column spots for November for the Wall Street Journal. The topics this time were; 'hand sanitizers' (sneaking in a self portrait in hiking gear), 'fountain of youth medication', 'safe sealants for children's play areas' and 'foot care'.

I also had a series of very tiny black and white spots for this same client during the month of November. I dont' quite remember what they were all about, but I suspect they were for some sort of article discussing various 'economic indicators'. The were quite possibly the smallest spots I've ever had to do, most of them only measuring 3/4 of an inch square in size (enlarged slightly here for this blog).
The only somewhat 'large' assignment this month from this client, was a piece on 'online dating sites' pictured below.

A piece for US Catholic about different versions of the painting 'Madonna and child', gave me an opportunity to ape a couple of artistic styles, and do a couple caricatures to boot.

The piece below was for Newsday, a lifestyle section piece about holiday preparations (who sits where, having enough tables for a large crowd, etc).

And then, finally, another fiction piece for Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine. This one was a departure for me and my usual 'dark' treatments for this publication. A rather sunny and bright illustration about a woman who moves into a house with a pool where a murder was committed by the previous tenants. At this time in the magazine's design, they would frequently include the title and author text in among the illustration, thus the white space at the top, fading out.

No comments: